The Vacant Lots, Lovely Bad Things, Cosmonauts

Love The Captive Presents

The Vacant Lots

Lovely Bad Things

Cosmonauts

The Quiet Americans

Wed, November 7, 2012

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Fulton 55

Fresno, CA

$7 Advance // $10 Door

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

The Vacant Lots
The Vacant Lots
Mexican Summer artists The Vacant Lots released their first 7" single 'Confusion / Cadillac' in 2011.
Pitchfork commented on 'Confusion', "It's executed so efficiently, with just the right doses of studied apathy and simmering tension, that it's difficult not to return to it's ceaselessly repetitive groove again and again."
Mexican Summer describes them as "musicians as well as scientists, having built a time machine that will transport your headspace directly to the Sunset Strip in 1967."

The duo takes as much inspiration from Bo Diddley and The Stooges as it does from Andy Warhol and Arthur Rimbaud and have developed their own sound, combining a minimalist aesthetic of rock n roll with hypnotic guitar riffs, heavy drumming, electronic drones, poetry-driven lyrics and visual projections -- creating a live multi-media experience.

The Vacant Lots have previously toured with Sonic Boom's Spectrum, Dean Wareham plays Galaxie 500, and most recently performed at Austin Psych Fest with The Black Angels and The Brian Jonestown Massacre.
The Vacant Lots are currently working on their debut album with NYC engineer/producer Ted Young and expect to have their second 7" single out on The Reverberation Appreciation Society by summer 2012.
Lovely Bad Things
Lovely Bad Things
Lovely Bad Things are a 4-piece band from Los Angeles, CA that started in October 2009. Our first full length entitled, “Shark Week” was released in September 2010 on cassette by UVR and our newest release, an EP entitled NEW GHOST/OLD WAVES was released July 2011 on cassette by Burger Records! And the vinyl release of New Ghost/Old Waves was released 3/13/2012 on Volcom Entertainment! We are Lauren Curtius, Brayden Ward, Camron Ward, and Timothy Hatch. ;)
Cosmonauts
Cosmonauts
"Their raucous set was like if the Velvet Underground had turned to the MC5 at their Boston Tea Party concert in 1968 and, instead of insulting them, had turned and made love to them—and that was how Lou Reed wound up wearing that dog collar. I couldn't make out a single lyric, but did they really close the set with 'Little Honda?'" --LA RECORD

"Swirling, distorted psych, bulldozed along by pounding primitive drums, fuzzed out vocals, all glued together with a heavy spaced out guitar drone. If that ain't the ingredients for record of the month my name is Prince Bloody William. Imagine if you will the best of THEE OH SEES jamming deep with MOON DUO, with the aid of some sort of retro type drug that only Brace Belden knows the name of and you would almost be right on the money. Heavy, without losing one single hook, repetitive without being the least bit boring and shamelessly stepped in the glory years of acid rock without being a boring regurgitating hipster. Be warned, this record will give you a contact high." --Maximum Rock N Roll #337
The Quiet Americans
The Quiet Americans
The wobbly uncertainty of a medium-fidelity, secondhand tape deck brings out the best in Fresno noise pop band The Quiet Americans on Medicine, their debut release. The band recorded the six-song EP on a Tascam 388 reel-to-reel recorder and mixer unit that singer/songwriter Luke Giffen bought from a friend of a friend for a hundred bucks. The 1980s era machine, still popular among self-recorded garage rock bands and analog purists, adds a fuzzy time-machine quality to Medicine that Giffen and company employ to great effect. “Be Alone” opens the EP with a gloss of guitar noise that feels a little warped and out of tune before drummer Eli Reyes powers the song forward. (Giffen and Reyes are the group’s main players; Simon Smeds, Steve Loveless, and Eric Peters join the live lineup now and again.) The second track and single, “Selia,” sounds like a hazy summer dream — the ooh’s and ahh’s of the chorus melt into a wash of organ swirl, cymbal smash, and Princeton reverb. The album’s middle selections would make a fitting soundtrack to a shoegaze sock hop alongside bands like The Raveonettes, Moon Duo, or any current Slumberland Records act. The closer, “Weird Mountain,” is the album’s standout. It shows a split personality, chugging along from the opening riff before guitar noise obliterates the hook and takes over the song. Each of the tracks on Medicine illustrates this quality: The vocals become just another instrument in the mix, and the mix pours on the layers from there. In one of the EP’s few moments when you can clearly make out the words, Giffen sings: “You never do what’s right. You’re always looking for an alibi.” On their first record, The Quiet Americans are far from doing anything wrong.

The Quiet Americans have opened for A Place to Bury Strangers, The Fresh and Onlys, Royal Baths, and Light Pollution.
Venue Information:
Fulton 55
875 Divisadero Street
Fresno, CA, 93721
http://www.fulton55.com/